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20091101
20091130
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WHUT (Howard University Television) 47
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Search Results 0 to 49 of about 87 (some duplicates have been removed)
PBS
Nov 23, 2009 12:35pm EST
prize winning columnist and best selling author tom friedman. >> what worries me about america today, charlie, is that we are produces suboptimal solutions to all our big problems. whether it is called health care. whether it's called financial regulation, whether it's call debt, whether it's called energy and climate. where asa because it has an authoritarian system run by engineers, not lawyers, can actually order through awe tore -- author toreian means in many case morse optimal solutions. >> rose: we turn to the middle east with two respected experts and authors eugene rogan and stephen cohen. >> people in the arab world who have continued to really hope to see a new dawn where they might take command of their own future and what not are finding themselves more powerless than ever. and there's a deep sense of malaise particularly after the war in iraq. that really has been radicalizing politics. making people feel like they could actually make a difference with the ballot. >> the united states needs to say to the world we have to solve the problem of our continuing confron
WETA
Nov 23, 2009 12:00pm EST
winning lumnist and best lling author to friedman. >> wha worries me about america toda charlie, is that we are produces suboptimal solutions tall our big problems. whether is called health care. whether it'salled financial regulaon, whetr it's call debt, ether it's called energy and climate. whe asa becaus it has an authoritarian system run by engineers,ot lawyers, ca actuly order through awe tore -- author toreian means in many case rseptimal solution >> rose: we turno the middle easwith two respected experts and authorseugene rogan and stephen cohen. >> people in therab world who have contied to really hope to see new dawn where they might take command of their own future and what not areindinghemselves more powless than ever. and there's a deep sense of laise particularlafter the war in iraq. that really has been radicalizing politics. making people feelike they could actlly make a dierence with the ballot. the united states needs to say to the world we have to solve the probm of our continng confrontation with the musm world it has undermined theuccess of president after presid
WHUT
Nov 2, 2009 11:00pm EST
qaddafi. his holeryness is well known in america having received the congressional gold medal and met with the past three presidents. he's on his sixth viz hit in the united states. it began in new orleans where he attended a symposium on pollution in the mississippi river. he travel new york where he met with ban ki-moon. tomorrow in washington he will meet with president obama and attend diners in his honor by the secretary of state and vice president. in 2008 he published a book called "encounter the mystery: understanding orthodox christianity today." i met him with in atlanta last week at the c.e.o. of coca-cola, a turkish citizen whose father was a distinguished turkish diplomat. the conversation began with a question about his role as he saw it. tell me about your role. >> by the grace of god i am the first bishop in the whole orthodox church worldwide. you may knee in the orthodox church we have the principal of the independent churches which are free to coordinate and organize their internal affairs. the local churches elect their primate and the role of the ecumenical patriarch a
WETA
Nov 3, 2009 12:00pm EST
moammar qaddafi. his holeryness is wellnown in america having receive the congressional gold medal and met with the past ree predents. he's on his sixth viz hit in the unit states. it began in neworleanshere he attended a symposium on pollution theississippi river. he travel new york where he met wi ban ki-on. tomorrow in washingto he will meet with present obama and tend diners in his honor by the secrary of state and vice president. in 28 he published a book called "encounte the mystery: understandin orodox christiaty today." i metim with in atlanta last week at the c.e. of coca-cola, a turkish citen whose father s a disnguished turkish diplomat. the conversation began with a questionbout his ro as he w it. te me about your role. >> by the grace of god i am the first bishopin the whole orodox church world. you may kneein the orthodox church have the principal of the indepdent churcheshich are free to coordinatend organize their iernal affairs. the local churches electheir prime and the role of the ecumenical patriarch as it is historic title of th patriarch of constantinopl today
PBS
Nov 4, 2009 12:35pm EST
at this table they worry about the deficit. does america have too much debt that it cannot bring the political will to do something about it. >> rose: well, let's realize we actually have two deficits. one is the fiscal deficit this which we need to bring down, but we also have this g.d.p. deaf which we are trying to work our way out of. >> rose: explain the g.d.p. deficit meaning. >> there's a gap between how much the economy could produce and how much it's currently producing which at the beginning of this year was estimated to amount to more than a trillion dollars. to start to fill that hole, we had to take steps like the recovery act to try to get the economy back on its feet. so the problem would be challenging if it were just a fiscal one. but we have the dual deficits and need to address both. and that makes it even more challenging. >> rose: because the current accounts deficit as well. >> which is a reflection... now one of the striking things is we really are living in an exceptional time. normally higher budget deficits-- and, again, last year we had a $1.4 trillion d
WHUT
Nov 4, 2009 9:00am EST
at this table they worry about the deficit. does america have too much debt that it cannot bring the political will to do something about it. >> rose: well, let's realize we actually have two deficits. one is the fiscal deficit this which we need to bring down, but we also have this g.d.p. deaf which we are trying to work our way out of. >> rose: explain the g.d.p. deficit meaning. >> there's a gap between how much the economy could produce and how much it's currently producing which at the beginning of this year was estimated to amount to more than a trillion dollars. to start to fill that hole, we had to take steps like the recovery act to try to get the economy back on its feet. so the problem would be challenging if it were just a fiscal one. but we have the dual deficits and need to address both. and that makes it even more challenging. >> rose: because the current accounts deficit as well. >> which is a reflection... now one of the striking things is we really are living in an exceptional time. normally higher budget deficits-- and, again, last year we had a $1.4 trillion defic
WHUT
Nov 3, 2009 11:00pm EST
at this table they worry about the deficit. does america have too much debt that it cannot bring the political will to do something about it. >> rose: well, let's realize we actually have two deficits. one is e fiscal deficit this which we need to bring down, but we also have this g.d.p. deaf which we are trying to work our way out of. >> rose: explain the g.d.p. deficit meaning. >> there's a gap between how much the economy could produce and how much it's currently producing which at the beginning of this year was estimated to amount to more than a trillion dollars. to start to fill that hole, we had to take steps like the recovery act to try to get the economy back on its feet. so the problem would be challenging if it were just a fiscal one. but we have the dual deficits and need to address both. and that makes it even more challenging. >> rose: because the current accounts deficit as well. >> which is a reflection... now one of the striking things is we really are living in an exceptional time. normally higher budget deficits-- and, again, last year we had a $1.4 trillion def
WHUT
Nov 11, 2009 6:00am EST
defaulted to italy which was the first international financial crisis. >> rose: are you suggesting america could default? >> well, i think we might inflate. that's how it's done when you're a rich modern economy. we'd really is to back ourselves into a corner to default. we did it once before in 1933 when franklin roosevelt said "you know how gold was $20 an ounce? now it's $35 an ounce." if you were living somewhere else, that sure felt like a default. >> rose: there are people writing that we may run out of money, so to speak. >> it's not that we're going to run out of money. we're rich. we can afford to pay our debts. we can afford to pay twice as much. the question is do we have the will? and will people on the outside-- chinese and others who invest in us-- believe we have the will to pay our debts? because you run into problems way before you think you should. you don't hit the limits that you think would be possible. you run into problems where you just can't refinance your debt. and you say "i'll pay i'll pay. but the creditors don't believe you. >> rose: so the bottom line, americ
WHUT
Nov 16, 2009 11:00pm EST
worried about... there's a standard argument that economists always use which is america has to consume less and china has to consume more. this may be true from an economic point of view, but if we consume less, their exports decline. that has a huge impact on their employment situation. as they consume more, it has a major impact on the surrounding countries and their ties to china. so what that phrase really means is a shift in overall relationships. that is what is new in the situation. it's not any individual decision that can be taken. >> rose: so what should the dialogue be about? >> well, i think the relationship with china is good and the administration has conducted it appropriately. and, well, there's a big cultural difference between china and the united states in any administration. the chinese look at foreign policy and strategy as a continuing process extended over a long period of time. carefully assessed as to its purposes. american foreign policy generally is conducted as a series of pragmatic solutions to individual problems that emerge that change and then they are d
PBS
Nov 11, 2009 12:35pm EST
america could default? >> well, i think we might inflate. that's how it's done when you're a rich modern economy. we'd really is to back ourselves into a corner to default. we did it once before in 1933 when franklin roosevelt said "you know how gold was $20 an ounce? now it's $35 an ounce." if you were living somewhere else, that sure felt like a default. >> rose: there are people writing that we may run out of money, so to speak. >> it's not that we're going to run out of money. we're rich. we can afford to pay our debts. we can afford to pay twice as much. the question is do we have the will? and will people on the outside-- chinese and others who invest in us-- believe we have the will to pay our debts? because you run into problems way before you think you should. you don't hit the limits that you think would be possible. you run into problems where you just can't refinance your debt. and you say "i'll pay, i'll pay. but the creditors don't believe you. >> rose: so the bottom line, america has too much debt? >> our trajectory of debt is a big problem. there's a risk that the
WHUT
Nov 13, 2009 11:00pm EST
crisis since the great depression. at that time, hides that america had been struck by an economic pearl harbor but much has chked since then, and he's here to tell us how he views a global and american economy in recovery. last week berkshire hathaway struck a $26 billion deal to buy all of burlington northern santa fe railroad, the largest acquisition in company history. he called the deal an all-out wager on the american economy. he is in new york for a town hall event he held with bill gates yesterday. he graciously agreed to stay over an extra night and i am pleased to have a good friend of mine back at this table. >> thank you, charlie. great to be here. >> rose: great to see you. it has been, certainly from the middle of008 to the middle of 2009, one incredible year. >> one incredible year. ( laughter ) once in a lifetime, i hope. >> rose: tell me about it for you. >> well, it was-- it really was an extraordinary time in this country. we came closer to a financial meltdown than certainly any time ooefr ever seen, and probably in certain respects there was even more panic tha
WETA
Nov 16, 2009 12:00pm EST
america had been struck byn economic pear harbor butmuch has chked since then, d he's here to tell uhow he vie a global and aricanconomy in recovery. last wk berkshire hathaway struck a $26 billion deal to buy all oburlington nohern santa fe railroad, the largest acisition in company history he called the deal an all-out wager the american ecomy. he i in new york for town hallvent heeld witbill tes yesterday. he gracisly agreed to stay over anxtra night and i am pleased to have a good friendof mine back at thisable. >> thank you, charlie. great to be here. >> rose: great to see you. it has been,ertainly from the middle of008 to the middle of 2009, on incredibleyear. >>ne incredible year. ( laught ) once in a lifetime, i hope. >> rose: tl me about it for you. well, it was it really was an eraordinary time in this country. we came closer to a financial meltdown than certainly any time ooefr ever sn, and probablyn certain reects there was even more panic than the gat depression because icame on so fast a so unexpected. and th country wanted to delevera, and ftunately we had a government that
WETA
Nov 13, 2009 11:30pm EST
america had been struck byn economic pear harbor butmuch has chked since then, d he's here to tell uhow he vie a global and aricanconomy in recovery. last wk berkshire hathaway struck a $26 billion deal to buy all oburlington nohern santa fe railroad, the largest acisition in company history he called the deal an all-out wager the american ecomy. he i in new york for town hallvent heeld witbill tes yesterday. he gracisly agreed to stay over anxtra night and i am pleased to have a good friendof mine back at thisable. >> thank you, charlie. great to be here. >> rose: great to see you. it has been,ertainly from the middle of008 to the middle of 2009, on incredibleyear. >>ne incredible year. ( laughter ) once in a lifetime, i hope. >> rose: tl me about it for you. >> well, it was it really was an eraordinary time in this country. we came closer to a financial meltdown than certainly any time ooefr ever sn, and probablyn certain reects there was even more panic than the gat depression because icame on so fast a so unexpected. and th country wanted to delevera, and ftunately we had a government
WETA
Nov 4, 2009 11:00pm EST
america onivil right was a ange of min and hea on t part of millions o people at the grass-roots level. this is now t largest, stest-growing movement in history. but the challenge isso great it needs to gw even faster. i have an organization called the alliance r climate protection. thers a web site, if may mention it, repoweramerica.or and lots and lots of people are joining that orgazation. we work in claboration with otherroups, pushing toward the same objective an trying t get this legislation d this treaty. >> re: our mutual frie, i sume, e.o. wilson... >> y. >> rose: has written a book in which makes...e's tryingo find you know, .. he's trying to find commonause with the regious community. yes. >> rose: andspecially fundamental christian mmunity. >> yes. >> rose: how is tt going and are you part of that? >> yes, yes, i am. and, by t way, the christian coalition has just joid this movement. becausthey believe-- as the bible teaches-- the earth the lord's andhe fullness thereof. we hav a duty of stewardship over god's creation. rich sizeic is among the many evgelical leaders
WHUT
Nov 30, 2009 6:00am EST
think that they are a superpower. my interrogater told me that the americans, america is waning, america's power is waning and we are going to be the surpower very soon. and we have allies all over the world, all over the region in lebanon, in iraq, in afghanistan, in venezuela, in bolivia. but at the same time they are afraid of individuals like me who are just doing their jobs, you know. i don't have that much power. most of these people that they arrested are just individuals and they were just demonstrating peacefully. so that is the mentality of the revolutionary guard. >> rose: are they surprised that there is that kind of hostility and that kind of in depth and in width of protest against them? >> yeah, i think they are -- they were surprised in the beginning. but then they enjoyed it. the reason i'm saying is that the revolutionary guard, they only thrive in chaos. they cannot operate in a normal situation. if there is any sense of normal see and transparency, that is the end of them because they are corrupt. they do many things surreptitiously, they hav these foundation
WHUT
Nov 2, 2009 6:00am EST
few people that i think still are standing in my way. but -- but you know, i like america. america is a wonderful country. and you know, and i wasn't down on multinationalism just because we seem to be forgetting how wonderful our own country is. you know, and we really have to help americans. you know, it's not just -- there are a lot of parts of america which should have a much better chance. >> rose: thank you for coming. >> thank you vy much. >> rose: james watson, for the hour. thank you for joining us. see you next time. captioning sponsored by rose communications captioned by media access group at wgbh access.wgbh.org
PBS
Nov 2, 2009 12:35pm EST
my way. but -- but you know, i like america. america is a wonderful country. and you know, and i wasn't down on multinationalism just because we seem to be forgetting how wonderful our own country is. you know, and we really have to help americans. you know, it's not just -- there are a lot of parts of america which should have a much better chance. >> rose: thank you for coming. >> thank you very much. >> rose: james watson, for the hour. thank you for joining us. see you next time. captioning sponsored by rose communications captioned by media access group at wgbh access.wgbh.org suppose this grass is damp. thou'll get a soggy behind. aw, sit thee down. thy bottom's waterproof, isn't it? true, otherwise cups of tea would come straight through. you can't be too careful. i've seen men delirious with jungle fever. hey up. we're off again-- him and errol flynn in burma. not much jungle round here till you get nearly to leeds. i'd like to see you lot try to make a camp in a mango swamp. hardship? you don't know what hardship is. and you're going to tell us, aren't you? bad for the p
WHUT
Nov 5, 2009 9:00am EST
rights movement has your inspiring leaders, but what changed america on civil rights was a change of mind and heart on the part of millions of people at the grass-roots level. this is now the largest, fastest-growing movement in history. but the challenge is so great it needs to grow even faster. i have an organization called the alliance for climate protection. there's a web site, if i may mention it, repoweramerica.org and lots and lots of people are joining that organization. we work in collaboration with other groups, pushing toward the same objective and trying to get this legislation and this treaty. >> rose: our mutual friend, i assume, e.o. wilson... >> yes. >> rose: has written a book in which he makes... he's trying to find, you know, a... he's trying to find common cause with the religious community. >> yes. >> rose: and especially fundamental christian community. >> yes. >> rose: how is that going and are you part of that? >> yes, yes, i am. and, by the way, the christian coalition has just joined this movement. because they believe-- as the bible teaches-- the earth i
WETA
Nov 13, 2009 12:00am EST
thvastajority of america never got to see who ty were to get h elected and haven't seen texperience. he's kind of a secret ninja behind it all. >> charlie: his bo comes out this week so we'l see how he saw the campaign. >> he's like rain man to me. head all the numbers end his head and knew howany delegates weren every county in every state and count them off as the returns were coming in. >> chaie: and the ielligence to go to iowa and to understand to gout fl op in ia could make or break you -- >> and go early. >> charlie: and go early. >> and i thinkhe secti on iowa -- to mee said with these guys as we starte with the film it has to be a fil as intereing to the next karl rove as its to anobama, you know, supporter in thesense that this shld illunate what wept on the inside of is campaign. hothey got this done in a wa that's compellg to anybody and i do thinkhen y watch tha iowa section of th film, when you watch how these, new the underdog campaign s alying itself and howt was using young people, it vy illuminating portrait. >> charlie: wh makes him unique or special? is this intelligen
PBS
Nov 10, 2009 12:35pm EST
ignorance and extremism. we fight wars to protect america. our values, our interests, our allies. we fight wars so that we can achieve an end point that we think is in furtherance of that. so if we're going to fight this war, then everybody better be very clear what it is that we're trying to do. would we like to see education levels in afghanistan improve? absolutely. is that directly in our national security interests? probably not. so we want to help, but we want to keep focused on what is clearly in our national security interests. to dismantle, disrupt, and defeat al qaeda and its extremist allies. >> hillary clinton for the hour coming up. captioning sponsored by rose communications >> good evening, i'm roger cohen of the "new york times." charlie rose is in berlin where, earlier today, he interviewed secretary of state hillary clinton. he was participating in the celebrations marking the 20th anniversary of the fall of the berlin wall. world leaders and thousands of visitors converged on the city to mark the historic moment. the day was filled with a series of symbolic eve
WETA
Nov 19, 2009 12:00pm EST
ttime they are investments. so what we're saying is in the case of electrificati of america, and othercountries in the world, is more an investment. because, you know, when countries say we want to reduce ourependence on oil, when countries say we need to make sure that we'reringing the righ measures in orr fight climate change or you know, emsions... green gas essions and you brg solution which can correspond to both, tha ans reducing dependen on oil and at theame time limiting the emissions of c.o. 2 it's normal that you say okay, that's whate need in order to make this happen. and that' what the electrificatio coalition has been very clearly asking for. >> rose: imean, it w fred smith at fedex, it was you, who else was there? >> oh,here were about seven other... >> rose: members of... >> members ofhe coalition. you have utily companies, you ve people who are working as supplierof the aoindustry. ttery makers. you know,ifferent parers from different elds of industry. >> rose: speak to t batte question. where e we in term of battery chnology? who's going to pavehe way for the ba
WHUT
Nov 13, 2009 9:00am EST
-- i mean, we hear the names axelrod and the vast majority of america never got to see who they were to get him elected and haven't seen the experience. he's kind of a secret ninja behind it all. >> charlie: his book comes out this week so we'll see how he saw the campaign. >> he's like rain man to me. he hadll the numbers end his head and knew how many delegates were in every county in every state and count them off as the returns were coming in. >> charlie: and the intelligence to go to iowa and to understand to go out full stop in iowa could make or break you -- >> and go early. >> charlie: and go early. >> and i think the section on iowa -- to me we said with these guys as we started with the film it has to be a film as interesting to the next karl rove as it is to an obama, you know, supporter in the sense that this should illuminate what wept on the inside of this campaign. how they got this done in a way that's compelling to anybody and i do think when you watch that iowa section of the film, when you watch how these, new the underdog campaign was applying itself and how it was u
WETA
Nov 24, 2009 12:00pm EST
very exciting sectornd america and the world he reall underent on tecology for the lasten yearslmost since going backto 2000,999. so i think we're going to see a lot of... we're gog to see anotr wave of tecological innovaon and spending on technology. >> rose: what did you think whe yosaw warren buffett spen another $26 billi to buy wha he dn't own of the burlington northern >> well, i think it was... i think it w a great statemt thate made that he w investing in america. and i certaiy an erican patriot. but i... i'm no sure that amera's not going to haveo pay e price of three t five years of relatively sluggish g.d.p. growth for thi housing bubble a then for t wealth destruction that's occurred. 'm not connced that was the best placefor him to put money. but i admire his motives a his statement. >> rose: if y talk to warren buffett, he will tell you his pertise is priceot timing. which is yours? >> in the modern worl, running a hedge fund, you'veot to be able to more than just say thatt's a good value. there's got to bsome kind of... someing's going to happen that's going to make th
PBS
Nov 12, 2009 12:35pm EST
. the wave of jewish immigrants and come and transfer their skills to early 20th century america and starting on the board walks of atlanta city and infomercial to the time of television and you place him in the co context and what makes t infomercials work and they work in a way that is unimaginable. they sell product like you wouldn't believe and the same principle that began with the pedaler and when you're walking the product, you're not the story, right. the product is the story. i feel like in the commercials of television commercials of the last to years for 50 years we try to sell the products with the star. michael jordan sold information and you're focussed on him and not the underway and ron popeil's get is it's not him but the rotisserie. >> >> >> his passion for the product makes it come alive. here's another interesting thing about this. ketchup. there are 100 varieties of mustard, you think this may be good because it says a fancy european name and this is a variation. there's one ketchup most of us know, heinz 57. why is that? >> i have lunch with dave diamond, highs
WHUT
Nov 12, 2009 6:00am EST
come and transfer their skills to early 20th century america and starting on the board walks of atlanta city and infomercial to the time of television a you place him in the co context and what makes t infomercials work and they work in a way that is unimaginable. they sell product like you wouldn't believe and the same principle that began with the pedaler and when you're walking the product, you're not the story, right. the product is the story. i feel like in the commercials of television commercials of the last to years for 50 years we try to sell the products with the star. michael jordan sold information and you're focussed on him and not the underway and ron popeil's get is it's not him but the rotisserie. >> >> >> his passion for the product makes it come alive. here's another interesting thing about ts. ketchup. there are 100 varieties of mustard, you think this may be good because it says a fancy european name and this is a variation. there's one ketchup most of us know, heinz 57. why is that? >> i have lunch with dave diamond, highs in the grocery business and starts
WETA
Nov 9, 2009 11:00pm EST
. we fightwars to ptect america. our valu, our interts, our allies. we fight warsso that we c achieven end point tt we think is in furtherance of that. so if we're going t fight this war, thenverybody better be ry clear what it is that we're trying to do would we like to see education levels in afanistan improve absolutely. is that dirtly in our national securitynterests? probab not. so we want to help, but we want to keep focused on what is clearly in our national security interest to dismantle, disrupt, and deat al qaeda and its extremist allies. >> hlary clinton for the hour cong up. captioning sponsoredy rose comnications >> good eveng, i'm roger cohen of the "neyork times." charlie se is in blin where, earlier today, he intervwed secretary oftate hillary clton. he was participating i the lebrations marking the 20th anniversary the fall of the berlin wall. rld leaders and thousands of visito converged on the cy to mark the historic momt. the day was filled with a series of symbolic events. german chancellor anga merkel, along with former soviet leader mikhail gorbaev and polh solid
WHUT
Nov 27, 2009 9:00am EST
in the show called "humor in america" that he did when he was in high school which you see that he's collected pages from "mad" magazine, angelo torres who was a "mad" magazine cartoonist. >> rose: what impact and involvement did she in putting together the show? >> as much as one would hope but not more. i mean, that, again, was part of his generosity. every time we asked him for input with the design of the show, he was happy to offer it. but he also wanted this to be a moma show which i think visitors will find when they walk through the monster mouth into this new kind of arena that, wow, it is absolutely inside of tim's brain. it's still a moma show. so we had an in-house designer who worked on the show. basically any time we wanted input from him, do you feel this way, either he would defer to us and say "you guys know best" or he would come up with a new work that would help us understand what he was trying to do. >> rose: thank y very much. this is an extraordinary exhibition getting lots of attention. it opens... it has opened at the museum of modern art in new york and
WHUT
Nov 26, 2009 6:00am EST
have transformed families across america. we all know doris kearns goodwin she is the eminent presidential historian. she's also a mother, the mother of a soldier who served in iraq and afghanistan. his name is joseph kearns goodwin. he joined the army after the september 11 attacks and received the bronze star for his time in combat in iraq. he recently returned from kabul where he was an advisor to the director of strategic communications. i am pleased to have them together at this table for the first time. welcome. >> thank you. >> rose: she's been here many, many times so it's good to have you together. >> wonderful to be here. thanks for having me. >> rose: so take me back to 9/11 where were you? what did you think? what went through your mind? >> i had just graduated college in the spring of 2001, i was actually living at home with my parents, my mother and father, getting ready to go down to washington, d.c. where i was going to work fo a political consultancy probably in the back of my mind going to law school a few years later. and then 9/11 happened and it definitely
WETA
Nov 16, 2009 11:00pm EST
they're dog. but across america, you go in these public school systs and far from it, why would a great teacher want to go work in me of these really,really difficult schools? and so howo we create a system where we make sure we're incenting efftive teachers? we know what they look like. we know what the best practices are. they're spreading em to each other. and then you incentthose teachers to rk in all th schools across the nation and th's where i think w evolv with t work. then y've got to set them up with the right curriculum. >> rose: what's the answer to your question? how do we? >> well, we're wking on this. we're doing resrch in new york city and charlotte in rth carolina to really wk with the teache' unions and the teachers in the classrooms and the district managent to say what does effectiveeaching look like? whatre the supports the teachers need. you don't just com out of achers' college and you're immediately a great teacher. you often need coaching, mentoring, someo to look at youresson plan, compe your lesson plan. so we're doing a pie of rearch in the next year with a l
WETA
Nov 17, 2009 12:00pm EST
ose test scores if they're efctive and if ey kn what they're dog. but across america, you go in these public school systs and far from it, why would a great teacher want to go work in me of these really,really difficult schools? and so howo we create a system where we make sure we're incenting efftive teachers? we know what they look like. we know what the best practices are. they're spreading em to each other. and then you incentthose teachers to rk in all th schools across the nation and th's where i think w evolv with t work. then y've got to set them up with the right curriculum. >> rose: what's the answer to your question? how do we? >> well, we're wking on this. we're doing resrch in new york city and charlotte in rth carolina to really wk with the teache' unions and the teachers in the classrooms and the district managent to say what does effectiveeaching look like? whatre the supports the teachers need. you don't just com out of achers' college and you'r immediately a great teacher. you often need coaching, mentoring, someo to look at youresson plan, compe your lesson plan. so
WHUT
Nov 20, 2009 11:00pm EST
prize winning columnist and best selling author tom friedman. >> what worries me about america today, charlie, is that we are produces suboptimal solutions to all our big problems. whether it is called health care. whether it's called financial regulation, whether it's call debt, whether it's called energy and climate. where asa because it has an authoritarian system run by engineers, not lawyers, can actually order through awe tore -- author toreian means in many case morse optimal solutions. >> rose: we turn to the middle east with two respected experts and authors eugene rogan and stephen cohen. >> people in the arab world who have continued to really hope to see a new dawn where they might take command of their own future and what not are finding themselves more powerless than ever. and there's a deep sense of malaise particularly afr the war in iraq. that really has been radicalizing politics. making people feel like they could actually make a difference with the ballot. >> the united states needs to say to the world we have to solve the problem of our ntinuing confrontation wit
PBS
Nov 3, 2009 12:35pm EST
qaddafi. his holeryness is well known in america having received the congressional gold medal and met with the past three presidents. he's on his sixth viz hit in the united states. it began in new orleans where he attended a symposium on pollution in the mississippi river. he travel new york where he met with ban ki-moon. tomorrow in washington he will meet with president obama and attend diners in his honor by the secretary of state and vice president. in 2008 he published a book called "encounter the mystery: understanding orthodox christianity today." i met him with in atlanta last week at the c.e.o. of coca-cola, a turkish citizen whose father was a distinguished turkish diplomat. the conversation began with a question about his role as he saw it. tell me about your role. >> by the grace of god i am the first bishop in the whole orthodox church worldwide. you may knee in the orthodox church we have the principal of the independent churches which are free to coordinate and organize their internal affairs. the local churches elect their primate and the role of the ecumenical patria
PBS
Nov 18, 2009 12:35pm EST
u.s. and interact with many other chefs from other cultures. i discovered south america. i went to japan. and all of that is ultimately digested and comes back in the kind of... i call that smart fusion. >> rose: a look at china and the united states in the after math of the presidential visit and food through the skills of eric ripert next. captioning sponsored by rose communications from our studios in new york city, this is charlie rose. >> rose: this evening we continue our coverage of president obama's visit to china. earlier today he met with president hu jintao in beijing. the two leaders held a press conference, though neither took questions afterwards. here's a part of what they said. >> ( translated ): to preserve and promote the growth of this relationship is a shared responsibility for both china and the united states. the chinese side is willing to work with the u.s. side to ensure the sustained, sound, and steady growth of this relationship to the greater benefits of peoples of our two countries and people throughout the world. >> the major challenges of the 21st cent
WETA
Nov 4, 2009 12:00pm EST
stre, among foreign leaders who stop atthis table the worry about e deficit. does america have o much debt that i cannot bring the political willo do something about it. >> rose:ell, let'sealize we actually have two deficits. onisthe fcal defit this which we need t bring down, but we also havehis g.d.p. deaf which were trying to work our way out of. rose: explain the g.d.p. deficit meaning. >> there's a gap between how much the ecomy could proce d how much it's currently proding which at the beginning of this year was estimatedo ount to more than a trillion dollars. to start to fill tt hole, we had take steps like the recovery act to try to get the ecomy back on its feet. so the problem wouldbe challenging if it were just a fiscal one. buwe have theual deficits and ne to address both. and that mak it even more challenging. >> rose: because t current accounts deficit a well. >> which is a refction... now one of the string things is we really are livg in an exceptional time. normally higherudget deficits-- and, again, last year we had1.4 trillion deficit... >> rose: this ishe fiscal yea
WHUT
Nov 16, 2009 9:00am EST
economic crisis since the great depression. at that time, hides that america had been struck by an economic pearl harbor but much has chked since then, and he's here to tell us how he views a global and american economy in recovery. lasteek berkshire hathaway struck a $26 billion deal to buy all of burlington northern santa fe railroad, the largest acquisition in company history. he called the deal an all-out wager on the american economy. he is in new york for a town hall event he held with bill gates yesterday. he graciously agreed to stay over an extra night and i am plsed to have a good friend of mine back at this table. >> thank you, charlie. great to be here. >> rose: great to see you. it has been, certainly from the middle of 2008 to the middle of 2009, one incredible year. >> one incredible year. ( laughter ) on in a lifetime, i hope. >> rose: tell me about it for you. >> well, it was-- it really was an extraordinary time in this country. we came closer to a financial meltdown than certainly any time ooefr ever seen, and probably in certain respects there was even more panic than th
WHUT
Nov 17, 2009 9:00am EST
some concept of a pacific partnership community rathe than of asia against america. they have adequate understanding wetheir importance. need is rather than to say let us fix the immediate curren problems is to have some general discussion ofhere the world eco will beoing and what we all have to do over a period of. w do we handle the question of preratn in a long-termnse. and'm quite optistic. cause the chinese, in my inion, have concluded that they need long periodof cooperation th the united stes forheir own developm we hav concluded twe have enough problems in theor without taking on confrontations with china. theone of what bot sides are saying is ereme positive so we are staing from aather strong opposition. we have a lot of huge problems. have thear problem in rea, we have thenuclear problem in iran. have... of urse a whole array of problems, eachf which... ghanistan and so forth. d en we have e nancial sues but they rlly ar issues of the construction of a new wod order. 's what this is about. and that's the sort of dlogue the chinese are generally good . d as. and so a
WHUT
Nov 16, 2009 6:00am EST
crisis since the great depression. at that time, hides that america had been struck by an economic pearl harbor but much has chked since then, and he's here to tell us how he views a global and american economy in recovery. last week berkshire hathaway struck a $26 billion deal to buy all of burlington northern santa fe railroad, the largest acquisition in company history. he called the deal an all-out wager on the american economy. he is in new york for a town hall event he held with bill gates yesterday. he graciously agreed to stay over an extra night and i am pleased to have a good friend of mine back at this table. >> thank you, charlie. great to be here. >> rose: great to see you. it has been, certainly from the middle of 2008 to the middle of 2009, one incredible year. >> one incredible year. ( laughter ) once in a lifetime, i hope. >> rose: tell me about it for you. >> well, it was-- it really was an extraordinary time in this country. we came closer to a financial meltdown than certainly any time ooefr ever seen, and probably in certain respects there was even more panic t
WHUT
Nov 24, 2009 9:00am EST
sector and america and the world have really underspent on technology for the last ten years almost since going back to 2000, 19. so i think we're going to see a lot of... we're going to see another wave of technological innovation and spending on technology. >> rose: what did you think when you saw warren buffett spent another $26 billion to buy what he didn't own of the burlington northern? >> well, i think it was... i think it was a great statement that he made that he was investing in america. and i'mcertainly an american patriot. but i... i'm not sure that america's not going to have to pay the price of three to five years of relatively sluggish g.d.p. growth for this housing bubble and then for the wealth destruction that's occurred. so i'm not convinced that was the best place for him to put money. but i admire his motives and his statement. >> rose: if you talk to warren buffett, he will tell you his expertise is price not timing. which is yours? >> in the modern world, running a hedge fund, you've got to be able to do more than just say that it's a good value. there's got t
PBS
Nov 30, 2009 12:00pm EST
the americans, america is waning, america's power is waning and we are going to be the superpower very soon. and we have allies all over the world, all over the region in lebanon, in iraq, in afghanistan, in venezuela, in bolivia. but at the same time they are afraid of individuals like me who are just doing their jobs, you know. i don't have that much power. most of these people that they arrested are just individuals and they were just demonstrating peacefully. so that is the mentality of the revolutionary guard. >> rose: are they surprised that there is that kind of hostility and that kind of in depth and in width of protest against them? >> yeah, i think they are -- they were surprised in the beginning. but then they enjoyed it. the reason i'm saying is that the revolutionary guard, they only thrive in chaos. they cannot operate in a normal situation. if there is any sense of normal see and transparency, that is the end of them because they are corrupt. they do many things surreptitiously, they have these foundations that are just answerable to the supreme leader. and they jus
WHUT
Nov 5, 2009 6:00am EST
inspiring leaders, but what changed america on civil rights was a change of mind and heart on the part of millions of people at the grass-roots level. this is now the largest, fastest-growing movement in history. but the challenge is so great it needs to grow even faster. i have an organization called the alliance for climate protection. there's a web site, if i may mention it, repoweramerica.org and lots and lots of people are joining that organization. we work in collaboration with other groups, pushing toward the same objective and trying to get this legislation and this treaty. >> rose: our mutual friend, i assume, e.o. wilson... >> yes. >> rose: has written a book in which he makes... he's trying to find, you know, a... he's trying to find common cause with the religious community. >> yes. >> rose: and especially fundamentalchristian community. >> yes. >> rose: how is that going and are you part of that? >> yes, yes, i am. and, by the way, the christian coalition has just joined this movement. because they believe-- as the bible teaches-- the earth is the lord's and the fullness t
WHUT
Nov 4, 2009 11:00pm EST
movement has your inspiring leaders, but what changed america on civil rights was a change of mind and heart on the part of millions of people at the grass-roots level. this is now the largest, fastest-growing movement in history. but the challenge is so great it needs to grow even faster. i have an organization called the alliance for climate protection. there's a web site, if i may mention it, repoweramerica.org and lots and lots of people are joining that organization. we work in collaboration with other groups, pushing toward the same objective and trying to get this legislation and this treaty. >> rose: our mutual friend, i assume, e.o. wilson... >> yes. >> rose: has written a book in which he makes... he's trying to find, you know, a...he's trying to find common cause with the religious community. >> yes. >> rose: and especially fundamental christian community. >> yes. >> rose: how is that going and are you part of that? >> yes, yes, i am. and, by the way, the christian coalition has just joined this movement. because they believe-- as the bible teaches-- the earth is the lord's
PBS
Nov 5, 2009 12:35pm EST
what changed america on civil rights was a change of mind and heart on the part of millions of people at the grass-roots level. this is now the largest, fastest-growing movement in history. but the challenge is so great it needs to grow even faster. i have an organization called the alliance for climate protection. there's a web site, if i may mention it, repoweramerica.org and lots and lots of people are joining that organization. we work in collaboration with other groups, pushing toward the same objective and trying to get this legislation and this treaty. >> rose: our mutual friend, i assume, e.o. wilson... >> yes. >> rose: has written a book in which he makes... he's trying to find, you know, a... he's trying to find common cause with the religious community. >> yes. >> rose: and especially fundamental christian community. >> yes. >> rose: how is that going and are you part of that? >> yes, yes, i am. and, by the way, the christian coalition has just joined this movement. because they believe-- as the bible teaches-- the earth is the lord's and the fullness thereof. we have a dut
WETA
Nov 13, 2009 12:00pm EST
names axrod and e vast majority of america never got to see whohey were to getim elected and haven't seenhe experienc he's kind of a secret ninja behind it all. >> charlie: his ok comes out this week so wel see how he saw the campaign. >> he's like rain man to me. had all the numbers end his head and knew h many delegates we in every county in every state and count th off a the returns were comingin. >> crlie: and thentelligence to go to iowa an to understan too outullstop inowa could make or break y -- >> and go early. >> charlie: and go early. >> and i think the secon on iowa -- to me we said with these guys as we stard with the film it has to be a fm as intesting to the next karl rove as is to obama, you know, supporter in the sense that this ould ilminate what wept on the inside ofthis campaign. w they got this done in a y that's compeing to anybody and i do think whenou watch tt iowa section of e film, when you watch how these, n the underdog campaigwaspplying itself and h it was using young people, 'sery illuminating portrait. >> charlie: at makes him unique or special? is this
WETA
Nov 18, 2009 12:00pm EST
democracy. cha is very important to us but japan d dia and the e.u. anatin america are equal if not re important to us. it's a balancing idea that you do not considechina a strategic imperative, you work with other nations that which e much closer to us, democrs, yacieork wh them wi an equal emphasis as we do to chi. second, as f as taiwan is concerne i have simple message: cnge the subject to economics. get china and taiwan talking about interrelationships on ecomic grounds, iestment from taiwan has neree higher. it's crucial thine growth, it's crual t stability. that is a cd we should be playinmuch more actively. >> rose: an appreciation james lily who diedat 81. captioning sponsored by rose communicaons captioned media accessroup at wgbh cess.wgbh.org
PBS
Nov 13, 2009 12:35pm EST
internal -- i mean, we hear the names axelrod and the vast majority of america never got to see who they were to get him elected and haven't seen the experience. he's kind of a secret ninja behind it all. >> charlie: his book comes out this week so we'll see how he saw the campaign. >> he's like rain man to me. he had all the numbers end his head and knew how many delegates were in every county in every state and count them off as the returns were coming in. >> charlie: and the intelligence to go to iowa and to understand to go out full stop in iowa could make or break you -- >> and go early. >> charlie: and go early. >> and i think the section on iowa -- to me we said with these guys as we started with the film it has to be a film as interesting to the next karl rove as it is to an obama, you know, supporter in the sense that this should illuminate what wept on the inside of this campaign. how they got this done in a way that's compelling to anybody and i do think when you watch that iowa section of the film, when you watch how these, new the underdog campaign was applying itself and ho
WETA
Nov 2, 2009 12:00pm EST
at ihink still are standing in my way. but-ut you knowi like america. america is a wonderful country. and you know a iasn't do on multinationalism just because wseem to be forgetting h wonderful our own couny is. you know, and we rlly have to help americans. you know, it's not jt -- therare a loof parts of americwhich should have a much betterchance. >> rose:hank you for coming. >>hank you very much. >> rose:ames watson, for the hour. thank you for joining us. see you next time. captioni sponsored by rose communications captioned by media access group at wg access.wgbh.g
WETA
Nov 23, 2009 11:00pm EST
be a very citing sector and america and th world have really underspen on technoly for the last ten years almt since going back to 2000, 199 so i think we're going t see a lo of... we're going to see another ve of technolical innovation and spending on technology. >> rose: what did you think wn u saw warre buffett spt another $26 bilon to buy wt heidn't own of the burlington nohe? >> well, i think it was... i think itas a great statent th he made that heas investing in america. and'm certnly anamerican patriot. but i... i'm t sure that amica's not going to have to pathe price of threeo five years of relatively sluggish g.d.p. growth for ts housing bubblend then forhe wealth destruction that occurred. so i'm not cvinced that was th best place for him to put money. but i admire his motivesnd his statement. >> rose: ifou talk to warren buffett, he will tell you his expertise is price not timing. which is yours? >> in the modern wod, running a hedge fund, you've got to be able tdo more than just say th it's a good value. there's got toe some kind of... sothing's going to happen that's g
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